FAQ

Have any questions? Take a look through our frequently asked questions:

 If you are still not 100% sure you will qualify, simply fill out your details in the application and we will call you back to confirm.

How far back can I make a claim for flight delay compensation?

Due to the statute of limitations in England and Wales, compensation claims for flight delays, flight cancellations, missed connections, denied boarding and flight reroutes can only be made upto six years after the date of your original flight.

If your flight is near the six year mark, we recommend you start claim proceedings so your flight delay claim does not expire before a settlement is made

How much compensation will I receive?

The amount of compensation awarded for any flight delay claim will vary per passenger, it could be between £110-£540. Compensation is determined by the length of your delay and the distance you were flying. The amount is fixed regardless of the cost of the ticket

Can I claim on behalf of other passengers in my party?

Yes, you can act as the lead passenger while processing your flight delay compensation claim but any money awarded will go to each individual member in the party unless we have written consent from the passenger to do otherwise

Children have the same right to flight delay compensation as adults: All passengers are eligible to claim the same amount of money under EU261/2004 regardless of their age. The only caveat is that the child must have paid something for their ticket (i.e. they were not travelling free of charge). Even if your child paid a reduced fare and/or they didn’t have their own seat, you can still claim flight delay compensation on the child’s behalf.

Claimants who are under 18 will have to appoint a litigation friend, who is a responsible adult that agrees to handle any claims for flight delays on the child’s behalf.

Can I claim if I used air miles for the ticket?

Flight delay compensation laws exist to compensate passengers for the inconvenience of long delays. As long as you paid something for your flight, including if you bought your ticket using air miles (i.e. you were not travelling free of charge), then you are able to claim the fixed compensation amount set out under EU261/2004.

What airlines can I claim against?

Whether or not you can claim flight delay compensation depends on the countries that you take off and land in and, to a lesser extent, the airline. You can claim flight delay compensation if you are departing from an EU country or when you are landing in an EU country on-board an EU airline.

All flights taking off from the UK are covered regardless of the airline you are using. Likewise if you are flying from a destination within the EU (Spain, France, Italy etc.) you are covered on ANY airline. So whether you’re flying back to England from Spain or leaving Amsterdam on a connecting flight to go further afield, you will be covered by European flight compensation laws.

If you are arriving back in the EU from a country outside of the EU, you can only claim if you have been flying on-board an EU airline. If you are travelling between two non-EU countries then you cannot claim under EU261/2004.

The airline has offered me vouchers as compensation, what should I do?

Article 7.3 of EU Regulation 261/2004 says that compensation for cancelled or delayed flights should be paid in cash, electronic bank transfer, bank order, or cheque unless the passenger signs to agree to accept travel vouchers and/or other services in place of monetary compensation.

If the passenger signs an agreement to say they are happy to accept vouchers in place of money then the airline no longer has to pay out the monetary compensation outlined in EU261/2004. If you have not signed such an agreement then you are well within your rights to insist on cash compensation and not just vouchers.

Deciding whether to accept vouchers instead of money is an entirely personal decision. It is worthwhile comparing the value of vouchers you are offered with the amount of money you are due under EU261. At Flight Delay Expert we have had clients come to us who had been offered just £100 in travel vouchers to be spent on another flight, but after taking on their case we secured them €1200 in cash.

You should also be aware that some airlines offer vouchers with expiry dates, so you should be sure you will be travelling within the stated time period.

What is EU Reg 261/2004?

EU Regulation 261/2004 is the name of the law which deals with compensation for delayed flights, denied boarding, downgrading and flight cancellations. The regulation is intended to enhance and enforce passengers’ rights and to compensate them for the loss of their time and the inconvenience caused by long flight delays.

What does No Win No Fee actually mean?

It’s simple. Wdhen you choose to hand your flight compensation claim to Flight Delay Expert there’s nothing to pay up-front. In the unlikely event that we handle your case and your claim is unsuccessful, we won’t charge you a penny. When your claim is successful, we take our fees from the amount that you are awarded so you never have to deal with surprise legal bills or any hidden costs.In these instances, an airline does not have to pay compensation for any delays caused as long as they can show they took all reasonable measures to avoid the hold-ups.

I didn't book my flight directly with the airline but booked with a travel agent or other third party. Am I still entitled to compensation?

Yes; you would still be entitled to flight delay compensation in this case. The operating airline is always responsible for any delays, even when the flight tickets weren’t purchased directly with them.

However: if your travel agent decided to rebook you on another flight but the original flight was operated on time you are not entitled to receive compensation because in that case the airline cannot be held responsible for the delay you experienced.

What are extraordinary circumstances?

Flight delay compensation laws state that airlines must pay flight compensation for eligible flights unless the delay/cancellation was caused by extraordinary circumstances. This term applies to a number of scenarios where the cause of the delay/cancellation was out of the ordinary. Things like terrorist attacks, industrial strike action, sabotage and freak weather conditions are all considered extraordinary circumstances.

In these instances, an airline does not have to pay compensation for any delays caused as long as they can show they took all reasonable measures to avoid the hold-ups.